Obesity and diabetes are the greatest healthcare epidemics of our time. The rate of rise in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has no end in sight.

It is well known that the risk of having a heart attack and stroke increases when you are diabetic; but can you have these complications when you are not diabetic?

The answer is YES!

We now know that the real cause of most of the complications of diabetes is not as simple as the elevated blood sugar level; but it is the insulin resistance that drives the complications.

Insulin resistance means simply that your cells are less sensitive to your insulin. This requires the pancreas to secrete more insulin to overcome the resistance which causes the insulin level to be significantly higher than normal to achieve the same blood glucose level.

You can have insulin resistance even if you blood sugars are within the normal range. That is because your body is keeping the glucose level normal with much higher amounts of insulin.

The insulin resistance and in other words the high level of insulin are the root cause of most of the complications of diabetes and also obesity.

Patients can have insulin resistance for up to 10 years prior to the diagnosis of diabetes. It is extremely common in obese patient to have insulin resistance. This occurs partially because the visceral fat (abdominal fat) causes a state of chronic inflammation which is one of the causes responsible for the promotion of insulin resistance.

The prescence of insulin resistance places you at a very high risk of heart attack and stroke which collectively are called cardiovascular events.1

Unfortunately, insulin resistance is not routinely evaluated in the outpatient primary care offices. This makes insulin resistance a silent killer. Patients think that they are healthy because they are not diabetic yet; however they are already at risk for complications of diabetes even when the blood sugar level is normal.

 

The Metabolism Clinic is established as the destination for weight loss and reversal of diabetes. Based in Charlotte, North Carolina. www.themetabolismclinic.com

 

1-https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23300589